Article Abstract

Palliative bypass surgery in elderly patients with resectable periampullary carcinoma: a report of 45 cases

Authors: Zhao-Bin He, Min Jiang, Wei-Bo Niu, Cheng Peng, En-Yu Liu, Chao Gao, Jiu-Zheng Sun, Chuan-Zong Zhao, Jian-Guo Hong, Hui-Jie Gao, Rui Zhao, Jun Niu

Abstract

Background: This study aims to determine whether palliative bypass surgery (choledochojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy), which has a lower incidence of complications and mortality, remains an option for elderly patients with resectable periampullary carcinoma.
Methods: The clinical data of elderly patients with resectable periampullary carcinoma who had been admitted to Qilu Hospital and had undergone palliative bypass surgery in recent years was collected. Factors concerning these patients, including surgical duration, intraoperative haemorrhage, the incidence of complications, mortality, and survival rate, were compared to those in patients who had received radical surgery.
Results: Surgical duration, intraoperative haemorrhage, the incidence of complications, pancreatic fistula, abdominal infections, pneumonia, and postoperative hospital stay were found to be more apparent in patients in the radical surgery group than in patients in the palliative bypass surgery group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). However, regarding blood transfusions, deaths, biliary fistula, postoperative haemorrhage, wound infection, delayed gastric emptying, and heart disease, the difference was not statistically significant (P≥0.05).
Conclusions: For elderly patients with periampullary carcinoma, palliative bypass surgery offers safety, low risks, a quick recovery, a shorter surgery duration, less intraoperative haemorrhage, and a lower incidence of complications compared to radical surgery. Although it has a lower long-term survival rate compared to radical surgery, palliative surgery remains an option for elderly patients who prefer not to undergo the invasive procedure of radical surgery.